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 Christina and Donald McLEAN from Scotland 1837



Ewen (Hugh the younger) MCLEAN

Ewen (Hugh the younger) MCLEAN

Male 1836 - 1921  (85 years)

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  • Name Ewen (Hugh the younger) MCLEAN  [1
    • The BRB (p8) states "As can be seen from this list there are two Ewens but no Hughs yet both are the children of Donald and Christina, (nee McPhee). It would seem that to Donald, the name Ewen and Hugh were the same, as in his Will of 1846 he refers to his son-in-law Ewen McDonald as Hugh McDonald of Finniss."
    Nickname Hugh the younger 
    Born 26 May 1836  Kilmallie Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • Kilmallie is in Argyllshire in Scotland.
    Gender Male 
    Biography Notes Amongst those of the 'old hands' Mr Sloan asked me about was Mr Hughie McLean, and while I was writing the beginning of this sheet of paper that very old resident actually passed by my window, reminding me that he is now the 'last link' left of the strong chain of sturdy pioneers who formed the settlement of Strathalbyn, the only one left of all who held the first Xmas festival, humble though it was, where now this nourishing and beautiful town bears witness to their fine work of blazing , the way for civilization in the south. The Rankines came here in 1837, Glanbar, then Blackwood, then Meadowbank being the first holdings established, the McLeans owning the latter, arriving here soon after the Rankines. Their holding was a large one, and for many years they were leading men in advancing the growth and prosperity of the settlement. Of the sons, Allan retained Meadowbank, Hugh had a holding where Mr Allison now resides, and John went to Angas Plains, Hughie, who alone survives giving up farming many years ago. In 1838 or 39, I can't find out which year it was, but it was one of these two, Little Hughie, then a tiny prattler, took his part, if a small one, in what was doubtless a wonderful affair to his childish mind, if indeed that mind was old enough to observe anything at all, for near where the school room now stands there was conducted with all ceremonial rites the feast of Hogmany, the welcoming of the new year a ceremony observed in far-off 'Auld Scotland' amid the ice of snow and winter but in this 'new land of Australia' in the fierce heat of a semi-tropical summer day and night, everything in utter contrast. Of all who gathered at that historic event, over which Dr. John Rankine presided, not one is left to tell the tale save old Hughie McLean and what he can tell is naturally only hearsay, for he was too young to retain any lasting impressions of the memorable event, at which were gathered practically all the residents within many miles of this centre. And, alas, the time must inevitably come when he too will pass on to join the band of those fine old colonists to whom we of to-day owe so much! Well, it must come, nothing can avert the blow when it falls, but for though the old pioneers is 'stricken' with the years and his strength, is but a little, he is mentally bright as ever, apparently good for a few more years yet, and I hope that in the coming Xmas festivities he may be able to have his part and be able to tell those around him something of that first Xmas of his in Australia eighty odd years ago.

    (From JW Elliott's Jottings in Southern Argus on 9th December 1920, p3)
      [2
    Biography Notes Southern Argus, 10th January 1918, page 3, JOTTINGS (By J. W. E.)
    I was talking to an old resident of this district the other day, and we counted up the list of those left in the south of the band of early settlers really entitled to be called pioneers, and so far as Strathalbyn Municipality was concerned the total aggregated to the sum of one, Mr Hugh McLean, who now alone survives of the original settlers of the neighborhood. My friend, who made a special provision that I should not bring his name into the prominence of print, said?" I shall begin to consider myself as one of the pioneers soon, though I came out several years after the Rankine and McLean families reached here, my arrival dating somewhere about the time that the Tucker people came out, John Tucker, I think, being the oldest living link with that period." " No," he said in answer to a question, " I did not come straight to this district, but was settled here very soon afterwards, close on seventy-five years ago, and I have seen a great many changes in my time." Just while we were speaking, for it was " even, and the sun had set," the electric lights blazed up, and pointing to the brilliant illumination of the Post-office area, I said?This is a bit different to the old times? " My word?rather," he replied. " A great deal different. Why, even when we arrived, and settlement near Adelaide was fairly advanced then, such a thing as a kerosine lamp was a rarity, candles, chiefly home-made, being the generally-used lights. There was not a made road this side of Adelaide, not even a well-defined track in many directions, and the only means of getting about was by bullock-dray express, travelling on emergency at fully two miles an hour, or the quicker method of employing shanks' pony, the sight of a horse being quite a rare one." " There were of course no telegraphs or telephones in those days, no railway trains or motor cars, none at all of the conveniences the people of to-day think they could not have done without, and our tables were not set out in the style of to-day, nor did they bear the luxuries that are to be found on them now, even in war time?we lived the 'simple life' then and no mistake." "Some years after we settled here I got a job on the road that was being made out towards Willunga from the city, and with some of my mates I used to take an occasional walk to town?we generally took turn-about on different Saturdays. We lived the ' simple life' then anyhow, for meat was 1/6 a pound, and hard to get at that where we were working, and often when we got it to our camp, we found that the journey had been too much for it, so bang went our meat-dinner."
    " On one particular occasion, when we had been particularly frugal for several weeks we determined to have a real blow-out. Bacon was proportionately cheaper than anything else in the meat line, but as it was mostly ship stuff, made many a month before we got it, it was not as juicy or soft as it might have been, and for this one festive occasion we agreed to ' blow the expense' and indulge in the almost-unheard-of luxury of some eggs fried with our leathery rashers. We each contributed half-a-crown to the pool, and deputed the one of our party whose turn it was to go to town, to do the best he could with the money. He brought us home one egg each and a penny change, and it was my misfortune that when I cracked my 2/5-worth, to add to the savory pan, I found that it was, like the curate's good only in parts. Butter was quite out of the question, ship-carried jam, treacle, and when we could get it, dripping, forming our staple appetizers. The sea was not far off, and sometimes we managed to get a dish of fish, an enterprising Peter visiting us occasionally from the neighborhood of where Port Noarlunga now stands. We did not fry them in butter or dip them in egg and flour first as we do now, for reasons I've mentioned, eggs at 2/5, butter at 3/9 to 4/6 a pound for what we'd now dub ' inferior pastry' and flour selling at Colman's Mill at Strathalbyn at 5 per bag forbidding such dainty luxury." " Still, still?" and I noted the sparkle in my ancient friend's eyes telling of some happy memories passing through his mind?" still we had plenty of good times in those far-back days, and I wish I'd got them to live all over again." Just then another friend drove up in his car to where we were standing talking, and joined us in conversation, presently remarking (it was late in the evening, you may remember)?" Well, I must get on, I want to get home early to-night." He lived near Adelaide, and as he drove off, expecting to reach his destination in less than a couple of hours, my pioneer apparently engaged in some mental flights and comparisons, for after a moment or two of silence, he said?" D'y' know in the old days I've been speaking of that would have been nearly a week's journey, and a stiff one at that. I remember well that when I was courting my old lady?she was a bonnie lass in those days ?I lost many a good day's work going to
    see her, many a good day's pay : " and I noted a regretful tone in his voice at the lost " siller," for a moment, but he brightened in an instant, and as if to atone for the momentary lapse, said with genuine enthusiasm, " but she was worth it, she was well worth it, and now that we both will soon have to pass on, I hardly know which to wish?whether she shall enter her rest first and leave me lonely to wait my turn or whether I may be taken and leave her to face the future without me to fend for her." I could see my old friend was letting thoughts for the future supplant his memories of the past, so I bade him good night and left him to his musings.

      [3
    Died 5 Jun 1921  Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Person ID I-5330  Christina and Donald McLean | Ewen (Hugh the younger) McLean's descendants
    Last Modified 18 Sep 2018 

    Father Donald b1779 MCLEAN,   b. 26 Sep 1779, Blaich Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Oct 1855, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Relationship -1 
    Mother Christina b1787 MCPHEE,   b. 28 Apr 1787, Crieff Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Apr 1869, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Relationship -1 
    Children of marriage We are confident that there were 11 children - 2 X Hugh, 2 X Mary, Allan, John, Archibald, Ann, Rachel, Margaret & Jane.
    However, some researchers have proposed 4 others:-
    * RICHARD: This name appears on some 'Navarino' passenger lists [research: Which ones?], but this might not be based on the authentic record. There are no other indications of this Richard in colonial records (eg marriage, children, death, or Trove etc).
    * ELIZABETH: This name appears on some 'Navarino' passenger lists [research: Leadbeater & Cummings) but this might not be based on the authentic record. It is stated that she was born in 1835 or 1836, and died in 1907. There are no other indications of this Elizabeth in colonial records. (eg marriage, children, death, or Trove etc).
    * HUGH: BRB p8 "The persistent inclusion of a Donald and a Hugh McLean who arrived in 1840 by ship 'Tomatin' must be an error as the listed children the same 10, who with their emigrating parents and in the father's Will. These two may have been nephews. If they were of an earlier marriage of Donald, he had three sons named Hugh which is carrying things a bit far as to names! There is a family story that 'two sons were sent to Venezuela to look for farming possibilities' referring of course to the Donald and Hugh on the 'Tomatin' of 1840. Then not discovering anything suitable followed on to SA. Nothing further is known of them although two of the same name were at Naracoorte in the South East quite early, and the names of the families were the same as those of the Donald McLeans. They were not mentioned in Donald McLean's Will."
    * DONALD: See the quote for Hugh, above (BRB p8).
    This note was by Don Gordon on 30th July 2018. 
    Family ID F-1  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Ann MCBAIN,   b. 1838, North Uist Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1912, Adelaide SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Children 
     1. Donald MCLEAN,   b. Yes, Date Unknown
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2013 08:08:00 
    Family ID F-1734  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Margaret TANNAHILL,   b. 15 Sep 1839, Paisley Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Apr 1891  (Age 51 years) 
    Married 30 Apr 1862  Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
     1. Christina McFee MCLEAN,   b. 17 Apr 1863, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Mar 1926, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     2. Margaret MCLEAN,   b. 13 Apr 1864, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. c1869, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 5 years)
    +3. Robert Tannahill MCLEAN,   b. 29 Jan 1865, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1931, Adelaide SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  []
     4. Hugh MCLEAN,   b. 5 Oct 1866, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1929, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
     5. John James Frazer MCLEAN,   b. 1 Aug 1868,   d. 23 Feb 1938, Merredin WA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     6. David MCLEAN,   b. 1 Jun 1870, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Nov 1949, Wallaroo SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)  []
     7. Jeff MCLEAN,   b. 7 Feb 1873, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1906, Broken Hill NSW Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)
     8. Elizabeth Ann MCLEAN,   b. 9 Dec 1874, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Nov 1948, Merredin WA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     9. Jane Ann MCLEAN,   b. 29 Jan 1877, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Dec 1878, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)  []
     10. Jemima Adam Tannahill MCLEAN,   b. 3 Aug 1878, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Mar 1879, Strathalbyn SA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 28 May 2016 13:52:01 
    Family ID F-1740  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    0578 - Christina & James Keough with Hugh McLean.jpg
    0578 - Christina & James Keough with Hugh McLean.jpg

    Documents

    BDM 1870 Birth David McLean on 1st June 1870 in Strathalbyn SA to Hugh McLean & Margaret, nee Tannahill.pdf

    Stories
    1995 - Hugh (the younger) McLean & Margaret Tannahill
    1995 - Hugh (the younger) McLean & Margaret Tannahill
    Biography as published in the BRB in 1995.

  • Sources 
    1. [S-3] FS BRB - 'Donald & Christina McLean & Their Descendants', 1995, The BRB has a good index for each individual. Copies of the BRB available Strathalbyn National Trust Museum & Library, several libraries around Australia including State Library SA, and Western Australian Genealogical Society Bayswater WA Request assistance for locating a copy through 'Contact us' on this website. .

    2. [S-63] NEWSPAPER TROVE Southern Argus SA, Jottings in Southern Argus on 9th Dec 1920, page 3.

    3. [S-63] NEWSPAPER TROVE Southern Argus SA, page 3 in Southern Argus on 10th Jan 1918.

    4. [S-3] FS BRB - 'Donald & Christina McLean & Their Descendants', 1995, The BRB has a good index for each individual. Copies of the BRB available Strathalbyn National Trust Museum & Library, several libraries around Australia including State Library SA, and Western Australian Genealogical Society Bayswater WA Request assistance for locating a copy through 'Contact us' on this website. .
      Grave 1/82 Strathalbyn Cemetery SA

    5. [S-18] PUBLICATION Edwin Maclean's genealogy(no sources provided), Spouse of person 14-xi.